?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Anxious

I'm not generally prone to worry, but I'm anxious today. laurie_robey and I are working from home because we've started a program of injections for Buddha that are supposed to help him build up a resistance to his bazillion different allergies, and for the first few days we need to watch him closely to make sure there's no adverse reactions.

I can't give Buddha the injections myself, I freeze up. I'm the same way about not being able to cut people's hair -- I get nervous and panic. Just getting the little primer from the vet about administering the injection nearly gave me a breakdown. :-` What if there's a bubble in the needle I didn't see? What if I screw it up and hurt him or kill him? I know that if I'm careful it's nothing to worry about, but the stakes are just too high I guess.

I can hold Buddha for the serum, that's not a problem. In fact, it'd be difficult to keep me away from that. So with me holding him in place, and laurie_robey administering the needle, he got the first treatment this morning.

Now, to give him another one every other day for the next month.

Cry.

-The Gneech

Tags:

Comments

( 17 comments — Leave a comment )
exatron
Oct. 23rd, 2007 01:25 pm (UTC)
Gah! Needles! *Hides.*
dagucoon
Oct. 23rd, 2007 01:46 pm (UTC)
I had a cat growing up who was diabetic and we gave him insulin twice a day. They get used to it. We didn't even have to hold him. He knew when it was due and just jumped on the counter and waited for it. As for bubbles, are you sticking it in his veins or flesh?
the_gneech
Oct. 23rd, 2007 02:27 pm (UTC)
Flesh. "Subcutaneous," IIRC the term is. :)

-TG
dagucoon
Oct. 23rd, 2007 02:29 pm (UTC)
Oh then as long as it's not a needle full of air you got nothing to worry about. A tiny tiny air bubble in the flesh won't hurt him at all. And it's easy to make sure they isn't any bubbles too. Just relllaaxxxxxxxxxxx. Oh and you or your wife will prick yourself with a used needle. Just a heads up.
the_gneech
Oct. 23rd, 2007 02:47 pm (UTC)
Good to know, thanks. :)

-TG
aki_no_kaze
Oct. 23rd, 2007 03:43 pm (UTC)
agreed, I inject meds every week (intramuscular) and unless there is a huge amount of air, no need to worry.
the_mcp
Oct. 23rd, 2007 04:34 pm (UTC)
::nods:: Getting the air bubbles out is fairly simple, really. Ever seen a medical drama on TV? Notice how they always show doctors and nurses holding the syringe with the needle pointing ceiling-ward, flicking the syringe body with their finger a few times, then giving the plunger a bit of a squeeze until liquid comes out the tip?

Well, that's not just for show. (Although I'm sure the fact that it looks good on camera helps encourage the actors and writers to keep doing it. :) ) Real-world medical staff actually do that, for exactly that reason; tapping the glass helps encourage tiny air bubbles to detach from the plunger or cylinder walls and float to the top of the solution, where they can be forced out.

(No, I are not a doctor, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night. :) )
sirfox
Oct. 23rd, 2007 02:32 pm (UTC)
bubbles are really only a big issue for intravenous injections. It's not a big problem in subcutaneous ones. Have you got a sharps container for disposing the needles? I can bring you one if you don't
the_gneech
Oct. 23rd, 2007 02:47 pm (UTC)
We've got one, thanks. :)

-TG
kamau_d_lyon
Oct. 23rd, 2007 01:47 pm (UTC)
Having started IVs on trauma patients I can understand the concern and know that doing such things is not for everyone. That's where team work comes in and that's just what the two of you are doing. I hope this works out for your household feline.
goodluckfox
Oct. 23rd, 2007 01:54 pm (UTC)
Is this an intravenous injection, or a simple subdermal injection? If the latter, (IANAD) I wouldn't think bubbles would as big a worry. Maybe your more medically inclined readers can clear that up?
athelind
Oct. 23rd, 2007 03:07 pm (UTC)
As someone who experienced allergy shots firsthand, I only hope that they're as effective on housecats as they are on humans. My allergies as a kid were crippling, but the immunization shots worked. Hopefully, they'll work for Buddha as well.

Of course, since I'm still allergic to cat fur, there's a bit of irony there.
susandeer
Oct. 23rd, 2007 04:45 pm (UTC)
You guys will be just fine, Buddha has such good parents!
mammallamadevil
Oct. 23rd, 2007 06:52 pm (UTC)
dude, you guys have gotten Buddha this far...
that cat's a tough little bounding punk....

just make sure you get plenty of Mr. Affectionate Lap Cat therapy today!

MLD



cyberhorn
Oct. 23rd, 2007 06:56 pm (UTC)
you both will do fine and he will be the better for it
one day at a time
mg4h
Oct. 24th, 2007 06:30 pm (UTC)
gootmu and I were hand-feeding Sable for 10 straight days, and when I say hand-feeding I mean filling up one or two syringes of food and stuffing it in his mouth, so he'd be forced to swallow it.

Over and over and over again. He'd cry a lot.

I hated it, and I hope I never have to do it again. In comparison, the few times he got subcutaneous fluids were a breeze - he flinched a bit, cried because his dignity was injured, but he didn't feel it that much.

I feel your pain, even if ours was different. At least be comforted by the fact that the shot is over quickly :(
c_eagle
Oct. 24th, 2007 08:56 pm (UTC)
Iz it those behind the neck injections? Good luck nonetheless... :|
( 17 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

August 2019
S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow