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Speaking of Notoriety...

Scientific American: Why You're Probably Less Popular Than Your Friends

We are all more likely to become friends with someone who has a lot of friends than we are to befriend someone with few friends. It’s not that we avoid those with few friends; rather it’s more probable that we will be among a popular person’s friends simply because he or she has a larger number of them.

This simple realization is relevant not only to real-life friends but also to social media. In Twitter, for example, it gives rise to what might be called the follower paradox: most people have fewer followers than their followers do. Before you resolve to become more scintillating, remember that most people are in similar, sparsely populated boats.


-TG

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
radbaron
Jan. 20th, 2011 04:37 pm (UTC)
Scientific American, making confusing statements for 100 years.
sirfox
Jan. 20th, 2011 05:01 pm (UTC)
check out Malcolm Gladwell's "The tipping point". (or i can bring you the relevant audiobook)

In it, he explores three sorts of people (Mavens, Salesmen, and Connectors - the last of which is relevant to the link you posted) who are all involved in the hows and whys of social phenomena and the often counterintuitive reasons they work out the way they do, and how/why they often resemble outbreaks of disease.
rhanlav
Jan. 20th, 2011 05:52 pm (UTC)
Why You're Probably Less Popular Than Your Friends: "#1: Naked Lampshade Dancing At Office Party. #2: You never share any of the cheetoes, you scrooge! #3: I wouldn't call them friends. They more just associate with you, on occasion."

It's good that SA doesn't let me write for them...
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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