June 16th, 2003

Drezzer cool

*bops around the room*

o/~
You spin me right round, baby
right round like a record, baby
right round round round!

You spin me right round, baby
right round like a record, baby
right round round round!

o/~

CURIOUS ONLOOKER: What's a "record?"

ME: *stops dancing and looks at the readers* At least the song didn't mention 8-track cassettes.

*bops around the room s'more*

-The Gneech
  • Current Music
    Dead or Alive -- "You Spin Me Round"
Boromir battle

Wherefore Orcs? [Geeky Stuff!]

Tolkien is full of orcs, of course; the word itself is old or middle English if I remember correctly. So I kinda take it as read that the Professor's work is the primary source of the orc as a fantasy creature, as with the hobbit/halfling.

(In this context, I mean the term "orc" as opposed to the more-commonly used "goblin," and "hobbit" as opposed to references to "wee folk under the hills" or whatever.)

Anyway, I'm curious ... aside from D&D and other gaming-related material (including Elmore's "Sovereign Stone" setting, which is kinda-sorta gaming derived), is there any fantasy literature out there that uses the term "orc?" I've seen plenty of elves, a smattering of dwarves, a few very-deliberate "hobbits with the serial numbers filed off." But I've rarely seen the orc make a literary appearance. Generally, non-human, evil humanoid creatures I've seen in fantasy books are referred to as trolls or goblins, or some world-specific "darkling" or something similar.

So. What's up with the orc? Any thoughts?

-The Gneech
  • Current Music
    Eurythmics -- "Here Comes the Rain Again"